• Check out Medium.com’s Happy Birthday Special Education–It’s time for a REAL redo!

    Here's the link....https://medium.com/@miriamkfreedman/happy-birthday-special-education-its-time-for-a-real-redo-d541867d5fb2 And here'sthe post. On December 2, 1975—43 years ago, President Gerald Ford signed the special education law to end the exclusion of students with disabilities from schools. The law succeeded, even beyond its mission. We now educate all students with disabilities—some 6+ million—almost 14% of all students, while the law planned for 10% of students. Schools have [...]
  • ACT scores down…on the “common metric.” My question is–is it still common? Really?

    Here's the Wall Street Journal article, https://www.wsj.com/articles/act-scores-show-drop-in-college-readiness-especially-in-math-1539768600?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=1#comments_sector I was struck by the article's last two words, discussing the ACT's usefulness because it allows comparisons of students on a "common metric." We assume the metric is "common." The same for all students. It's a belief, but is it still real? As my loyal readers know, I have my growing doubts about [...]
  • Another College Board “Big Goof”

    as reported in Diane Ravitch's blog. https://dianeravitch.net/2018/08/30/mercedes-schneider-reports-on-the-college-boards-big-goof-with-the-sat/ Here's another College Board mess (add this to all the earlier discussion about their accommodation policy which does not notify anyone when tests are given under nonstandard conditions--especially with time and a half or twice as long... so that the SAT ( and ACT) are no longer standardized! Here, apparently, the College Board gave the [...]
  • It’s worth reading Diane Ravitch’s blog about the latest Ed Next poll.

    https://dianeravitch.net/2018/08/22/carol-burris-finds-good-news-in-latest-ednext-poll/ It's always fascinating to read the ups and downs of this annual poll. Issues include teacher pay, charters, vouchers, funding, etc. As a staunch supporter of public education, I"m concerned about a huge missing piece: special education. It involves about 13-14% of our students (roughly speaking, far more than twice those who attend charters or use vouchers) and the cost for their education is [...]
  • Another good intention gone awry–Title IX goes from soccer to sexual harassment

    Another good intention gone awry. When will we ever learn? Let's hope clearer heads will prevail so that we can restore opportunities for all students-- girls and boys alike; men and women alike. All of us. Thank you, Joanne Jacobs for posting this. Here is the link. http://www.joannejacobs.com/2018/08/title-ix-twisted-from-soccer-to-sex-harassment/#comment-227475
  • Students with disabilities sue ACT for disclosing personal information.

    Here we go again. The saga that never ends. That is, SAT and ACT accommodations saga. It's been wrong from day one and the reverberations just keep on coming. See recent stories about the overuse of these accommodations.... Back in 2003 I wrote ("Disabling the SAT") about the fact that these testing giants, the SAT and ACT, had just agreed to stop "flagging" test scores when the tests had been taken under nonstandard conditions. The SAT reached a settlement of a potential lawsuit [...]
  • Thank you! A student reacts to the overuse of SAT extended time

    Thank you, Luke Egan for bringing this issue to the fore-- again--and thank you, a loyal reader of my work, for bringing it to my attention. The opening paragraph is terrific, as it raises the issue by students for students. "The most polarizing issue in my high school’s community didn’t relate to religion or politics. It was the issue of extra time. Extra time, which is often given for in-class assignment and standardized tests, typically offers students who qualify 1.5 to double [...]
  • The story that just won’t go away–

    ...Ah, those SAT and ACT accommodations. Some students get accommodations--especially extended time (50 or 75% or ??? more time than other students--without ANY notice to colleges, schools, students, and parents that those tests were taken under non-standard conditions. Really? Yes, really. So long as colleges continue to use these tests in their admission process, the most basic requirement is that they be standardized. They no longer are--as we no longer know how students took [...]
  • Finally, a thoughtful question about inclusion….

    Finally, the question is posed: has inclusion gone too far? Do we know? Can we know? The question posed in this important piece by Allison Gilmour, published in Education Next is: Has Inclusion Gone Too Far? https://www.educationnext.org/has-inclusion-gone-too-far-weighing-effects-students-with-disabilities-peers-teachers/ At last, maybe we’re getting somewhere–that is, maybe we will start to focus on ALL students and ALL teachers in our schools when we set up [...]
  • Finally! Has inclusion gone too far?

    Finally, some research looking at inclusion from the perspective of students with disabilities, their peers and their teachers. The story is not so rosy--in fact, it is troubling. We need far more research. I've been writing about this issue for years--check out my Wall Street Journal op-ed and my book, Special Education 2.0. Here's the article by Alison F. Gilmour. It will be published in Education Next this fall. Check it out. Your thoughts? Has Inclusion Gone Too Far? [...]